fbpx

April-May 2020 | Regulars

Let’s be mindful

Let’s be mindful

Rotary Great Britain and Ireland President, Donna Wallbank shares her thoughts on being mindful of ourselves and of others.

Over the last few months, I realised I was using the term ‘being mindful’ or just ‘mindful’ within my vocabulary.

It was strange how people noticed it in conversation, presentations and day-to-day life. But I wasn’t aware of this until a friend’s banter brought it to my attention.

So why was that word being used in my communication?

Maybe because I was mindful of my own actions, mindful of how we are perceived by those unknown to me or you.

Or was it because I was mindful of my own needs, my own health and mental well-being, whilst also being mindful of the needs of those around me?

Mindfulness is important, for our own judgments or assumptions. That we should be mindful of how our beliefs will not be the same as another. Or even mindful of our individual or collective actions with the affect it can have on others.

Importantly, we should be mindful that society has changed and its needs will continue to change. In the 21st century, we must be mindful that what we say, do, write or even how we act. Mindful that the humour which we once laughed at, is now not acceptable in polite societies. Integration of all in society is required since what was once acceptable may not be now.

mindful

We should be mindful that society has changed and its needs will continue to change.

Society has changed, so we must be mindful of the interpretation of our actions, both good and bad.

Mindful that technology can track what we may have written, or what was captured by a picture or a video to celebrate or denigrate, how this can be used and how it can have affect others.

Mindful, that seeing or hearing words which are not meant to scar or hurt, but knowing they sometimes do, reminded me of the childhood rhyme, Sticks and Stones can break my bones, but names will never hurt me… I believe that’s not true because words can hurt.

Words leave scars. What was not meant to hurt sometimes does, from childhood to old age. When we act mindfully, we are less likely to be judgmental or defensive, but more likely to be objective in our interpretation of the actions of others.

We must be mindful that what we believe to be true, may not be seen as the same from another side. Mindful that what we see, may not be what is real; that the mask a person exhibits can be hiding a multitude of worry, stress, angst and hurt.

 

Mindfulness is important, for our own judgments or assumptions. That we should be mindful of how our beliefs will not be the same as another. Or even mindful of our individual or collective actions with the affect it can have on others.

 

Mindful that our actions can add strength to someone in need, when we are kind in word and deed. Mindful that our individual actions can bring together a strength for us, our family, communities and society as a whole.

Together, we are stronger.We should be mindful of our community’s needs, our service opportunities and everything we do in our daily lives – at work, at home or in our hobbies.

Remember, the impact we make when we work together is creating a greater good.

And maybe, for us all, but particularly for members of the Rotary family, we should be mindful in all we do, judging ourselves against Rotary’s Four Way test, rather than judge others.

I am mindful how the great work done by Rotarians is invaluable to their communities. I am proud to see and hear support given to those with differing needs to our own.

Importantly, I am mindful that Rotary membership is the greatest gift bestowed on me other than having my family.

And I am mindful that we should extend a hand of friendship so that others are enabled to be part of all we enjoy and do.

Tags:

Our magazine covers a wide range of fascinating features, exclusive interviews and inspiring human interest stories from across the world of Rotary.

Discover more

Rotary Magazine