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Supporting Education

Rotary club supplies laptops to primary school during COVID-19 pandemic

Rotary club supplies laptops to primary school during COVID-19 pandemic

As schoolchildren are steadily returning to class, so Rotary clubs are ensuring everyone is able to get involved by supplying computers for the youngsters.

Money donated by Shrewsbury Severn Rotary has bought nine laptops for a primary school.

The Grange School in Shrewsbury received the laptops which were then passed on to children from vulnerable families.

Said school governor Kerry Ferguson: “The purchase of the nine laptops was for use at home by children who otherwise would not have access to learning. They will be returned to school when things get back to normal.”

Headteacher, Charlie Summers has told Shrewsbury Severn Rotary Club that with their donations she will also make a safe, sensory area for children which will be called their ‘nurture space’.

The purchase of the nine laptops was for use at home by children who otherwise would not have access to learning. They will be returned to school when things get back to normal.”

This will be a space where children can go and calm down, think and talk about experiences with a trained adult.

“This will be a nurture base that we want to develop in the long run,” she explained.

The school staged a return from June 1 for nursery, reception, year 1 and year 6 children. Mrs Ferguson added: “There has been a positive response from parents and staff who are very supportive, although the situation is obviously very fluid.”

coronavirus

The Grange School in Shrewsbury received the laptops which were then passed on to children from vulnerable families.

North Fife Rotary in Scotland has been working with the Riverside Care Home during COVID-19.

They have supplied hand cream for the carers at the home, as well as providing a digital tablet for residents to keep in touch with loved ones.

During the pandemic, the club has been continuing to support Tayport Food Bank, Maggie’s Cancer Centre in Dundee, the CHAS children’s hospices, as well as the charity dogs for dementia sufferers.

Also in Scotland, Forth Bridges Rotary in Rosyth, has set up its own COVID-19 Response team. Founder member, Cath Chorley explained that their club was predominantly female, with two-thirds still working.

Their Covid team has been helping with shopping and collecting medication, as all as befriending with those the Rotarians are helping.

“Shortly before lockdown, one lady we were visiting lost her dog, who was her main companion,” explained Cath.

“When our member Izzy first visited, the lady said she couldn’t be bothered to get out of her pyjamas each day.

“As it so happens, Izzy also volunteers with a dog rescue team. In due course they rescued a little dog and asked the lady if she would foster it.

“Izzy took the dog to the lady said she would call in a couple of days. When Izzy went back, the lady was waiting at the door with the dog on the lead and in her best clothes, her hair was done, and make-up on.

“The lady says the dog saved her life, which she has now adopted.”

Like many Rotary clubs during the lockdown, Chipping Sodbury Rotary near Bristol has been successfully meeting online via Zoom.

During this period, the club has managed to support a good number of deserving organisations in the local community including the Vintage Birdcage Cakery & Café, to support their COVID-19 community efforts, the Blonde Angel Street Team which is caring for the those sleeping rough, as well as the Yate & Sodbury Foodbank.

During this period, the club has managed to support a good number of deserving organisations in the local community.”

Over the past year, the club has distributed almost £29,000 to deserving causes, who also include the St John Ambulance, Kids Out, the Yate & Sodbury Toy & Activity Bank, the Gympanzees charity, the Southmead Hospital COVID-19 Appeal, as well as Yate and Sodbury Scouts.

Across the country, in Kent, Rotary Satellite in Orpington is co-ordinating the community sewing of bags for nurses at the Princess Royal Hospital in Bromley.

Their first batch of 60 were well received and 100 more were due to be collected. The club has a team of more than 40 community satellite sewers, and their target is to produce 1,000 bags.