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Fighting Disease

Environmental charity looking for more Rotary support

Environmental charity looking for more Rotary support

With the easing of Covid restrictions, many charities are hoping this will kick-start their activities. Among them is Mires Beck, a registered charity based in a 14-acre horticultural nursery in East Yorkshire.

Under normal circumstances, they provide day care to around 100 adults with autism, learning difficulties and disabilities every week.

They grow around 300 perennials, 50 herbs, 100 Yorkshire wildflowers and 28 varieties of British trees.

And for over 20 years, Mires Beck has enjoyed a close relationship with South Cave and Wolds Rotary in Brough.

They have contributed both funds and labour towards a number of projects including building a bandstand and new poly tunnels for the tree nursery. The club also runs an annual Christmas toy appeal.

Mires Beck grow around 300 perennials, 50 herbs, 100 Yorkshire wildflowers and 28 varieties of British trees.  

“The nursery became a registered charity in 1994, and our links to the Rotary Club of South Cave and Wolds go back to 1996 when a new glasshouse was urgently required,” explained Marketing Officer, Graham Elliott.

“Help from the Rotary club, Country Land Owners Association and Northern Foods enabled this to go ahead.”

In 2000, when Yorkshire Water provided Mires Beck with a grant to create an irrigation system, South Cave and Wolds Rotary held a fund-raising event and club members spent eight weeks digging trenches, fitting pipework and sprinkler heads to complete the project.

The nursery became a registered charity in 1994, and our links to the Rotary Club of South Cave and Wolds go back to 1996 when a new glasshouse was urgently required,”

Since then, the partnership has grown. A large glasshouse was donated by a Rotarian from the club, who have been practically involved in a number of projects, including building an anniversary garden, which serves as a sanctuary for those with complex needs and profound disabilities.

The Rotary club has helped build a pergola bandstand, added computer controls to the irrigation system, and most recently, they funded two new poly tunnels to double the centre’s tree production.

During Covid, Mires Beck has had to stop service users visiting the centre since many of the staff were furloughed. They have just had a skeleton team on watering duties.

irrigation system

In 2000, when Yorkshire Water provided Mires Beck with a grant to create an irrigation system, South Cave and Wolds Rotary held a fund-raising event and club members spent eight weeks digging trenches, fitting pipework and sprinkler heads to complete the project.  

But once garden centres were allowed to open, their wholesale business has been very busy.

 “We’re very much hoping that the adults will soon be returning,” said Marketing Officer, Graham Elliott. “To this end, we are in constant touch with both Hull and East Riding councils.

“We want to work with local business and Rotary to join us in developing a sustainable long-term plan, through donations and sponsorship, to provide a new community building with amazing state-of-the-art facilities for service users with more profound needs, carers, and the local community.

“We already had plans drawn up, but then Covid struck.

“One way of doing this would be to increase our wholesale and retail trade, which will, in turn, increase the funds available for expansion of the day care aspect of our business.

“If there are any Rotary clubs involved in projects that involve the planting of trees, wildflowers, or phragmites – a marginal common reed used for planting in wetlands – we can supply them at favourable rates, depending on the location.”
Website: www.miresbeck.co.uk