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Community

Rotary clubs continue to make a difference in their communities

Rotary clubs continue to make a difference in their communities

The beginning of the New Year has seen a burst of activity from Rotary clubs who have been supporting their local communities, despite the lockdown.

Saffron Walden Rotary in Essex has responded to a call for help from Saffron Walden and District Riding for the Disabled. They donated £250 to buy six new riding hats.

Riding for the Disabled is unable to meet at its centre in Radwinter due to the pandemic but plans to re-open later this year.

Covid restrictions prohibit the sharing of riding hats, which has placed an additional financial burden on the Centre.

The Rotary Club was able to fund the purchase of hats from its Community Fund set up to help local organisations.

Local organiser for the Centre, Helen Doust, commented: “We would like to thank all at Rotary for their help with buying the new hats.”

The North Essex Rotary club has also been supporting a hospice in Epping Forest.

Saffron Walden Rotary in Essex has responded to a call for help from Saffron Walden and District Riding for the Disabled. They donated £250 to buy six new riding hats.

When St Clare Hospice in Hastingwood needs new stocks of personal protective equipment from a depot in Luton, the Saffron Walden Rotarians rallied.

With overstretched resources at the hospice, Saffron Walden Rotary was approached to provide drivers to collect vital supplies from the Bedfordshire-based Luton depot.

So far three trips have been made with more scheduled in the coming weeks. The Rotary club recently donated £500 to St Clare’s from its Community Fund.


In North Wales, Llandudno Rotary has made the first round of awards from its Community Chest.

The Llandudno Rotary Community Chest was established last year as a way of getting funds to small local groups for whom a few hundred pounds might make a huge difference.

In September, the Rotary club invited community groups from Llandudno, Deganwy and Llandudno Junction to bid.

The Llandudno Rotary Community Chest was established last year as a way of getting funds to small local groups for whom a few hundred pounds might make a huge difference.”

Among the recipients are TV Conwy, Penrhyn Bay FC, Llandudno FC , Llandudno Junction Jnr. FC, Ormeside Scout Group and Llandudno Cricket Club.


In Devon, an online Zoom session with broadcaster Simon Reeve has helped raise £3,500 for Tiverton Rotary.

Simon, who lives in Devon, is now a popular and much travelled television personality.

He makes travel documentaries and has written books on international terrorism, modern history and his adventures.

Simon has presented the BBC television series Tropic of Cancer, Equator and Tropic of Capricorn and recently made two programmes about Cornwall.

Last week, he spent 90 minutes on Zoom answering questions about himself in an event organised by Tiverton Rotary. He also read an extract from his autobiography, “Step by Step”.

The Rotary club sold 625 tickets to the event. The money will be split between Tiverton’s Churches Housing Action Team and Fathoms Free, a volunteer marine conservation and awareness group based in Cornwall engaged in ghost net and ghost gear recovery, as well as marine debris removal.

This means that CHAT will benefit by over £3500, much needed at this difficult time in endeavouring to find accommodation for the homeless, restocking its food bank and supporting other local folk who are in need.


Meanwhile, Rotary and its activities have honoured in the recent New Year Honours’ List for their work in communities.

Among those receiving an award is Ruth Perrott, who has close links with York Ainsty Rotary. She receives an MBE.

Back in 1991, the club asked a question of Ruth, who was then a speaker, what they could do to help her charity?

Rotary and its activities have honoured in the recent New Year Honours’ List for their work in communities.”

The Specsort project was started in 1991 following Ruth’s visit with a combined Vision Aid Overseas and Operation Raleigh project.

Thirty years later, York Ainsty Rotary is still sorting spectacles in support of Ruth Perrott and her annual visits to Africa.

Ruth, an optometrist who lives in York, said she would like to thank the York Ainsty Rotarians and individuals from across the UK who have shipped old spectacles to York.

As a result, through Ruth’s charity work, around 35,000 people have received help with their avoidable blindness. These include spectacles shipped to projects in Sri Lanka, Fiji, Yemen and Tanzania.